What Can Mimic MS?

Does MS show up in blood work?

Blood tests will likely be part of the initial workup if your doctor suspects you might have MS.

Blood tests can’t currently result in a firm diagnosis of MS, but they can rule out other conditions..

What other diseases can mimic MS?

These include fibromyalgia and vitamin B12 deficiency, muscular dystrophy (MD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease), migraine, hypo-thyroidism, hypertension, Beçhets, Arnold-Chiari deformity, and mitochondrial disorders, although your neurologist can usually rule them out quite easily.

Can MS be misdiagnosed?

Although the problem of MS misdiagnosis is known, true incidence and prevalence is not. Some data is available from case reports, and recent publications from specialized MS centers reported around 30% of cases originally referred for MS were finally diagnosed with other diseases (1).

How do you rule out MS?

Your doctor may then recommend:Blood tests, to help rule out other diseases with symptoms similar to MS . … Spinal tap (lumbar puncture), in which a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid is removed from your spinal canal for laboratory analysis. … MRI, which can reveal areas of MS (lesions) on your brain and spinal cord.More items…•

Can stress cause MS like symptoms?

Can stress cause MS? There is no definitive evidence to say that stress is a cause for MS. Stress can, however, make it difficult for a person to manage MS symptoms. Many patients also report that stress triggered their MS symptoms or caused a relapse.

What causes brain lesions besides MS?

Alzheimer’s disease, a condition that affects a person’s memory, thinking and behavior, develops because of plaques in brain tissues. Multiple sclerosis can also cause plaques in the brain secondary to damaged tissue. Exposure to radiation or certain chemicals that increase the chance of tumors and lesions in the brain.

What can mimic MS on an MRI?

Some of the most common mimics include migraine and chronic cerebrovascular disease, according to Dr Schiess. Vasculitic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren’s syndrome can also result in white matter abnormalities on MRI.

What does an MS attack feel like?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) attacks can include tingling, numbness, fatigue, cramps, tightness, dizziness, and more.

When should you suspect multiple sclerosis?

People should consider the diagnosis of MS if they have one or more of these symptoms: vision loss in one or both eyes. acute paralysis in the legs or along one side of the body. acute numbness and tingling in a limb.

Can you have MS for years without knowing?

Not Uncommon “MS is diagnosed most commonly in the ages between 20 and 50. It can occur in children and teens, and those older than 50,” said Smith. “But it can go unrecognized for years.” Added Rahn, “The incidence of MS in the United States according to the Multiple Sclerosis Society is over 1 million people.

What does MS feel like in legs?

Numbness & Tingling: It usually affects your legs. You might feel: An electric shock-like feeling when you move your head or neck. It may travel down your spine or into your arms or legs.

What does MS brain fog feel like?

Cog fog, or MS-related brain fog, affects many people living with MS. In fact, it’s estimated that more than half of people living with MS will develop cognitive issues like difficulty understanding conversations, thinking critically, or recalling memories. MS-ers call this symptom “cog fog” — short for cognitive fog.

What does MS feel like in the beginning?

While some people experience fatigue and numbness, severe cases of MS can cause paralysis, vision loss, and diminished brain function. Common early signs of multiple sclerosis (MS) include: vision problems. tingling and numbness.

Do brain lesions always mean MS?

An abnormal MRI does not necessarily mean MS. There are other diseases that cause lesions in the brain that look like those caused by MS. There are also spots found in healthy individuals, particularly in older persons, which are not related to any ongoing disease process.

Do MS brain lesions go away?

Will MS brain lesions go away? In addition to slowing the growth of lesions, it might be possible to one day heal them. Scientists are working to develop myelin repair strategies, or remyelination therapies, that might help regrow myelin.